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Stephen Hancock 

Department Chair, Associate Professor 

Stephen E. Hancock recently finished his PhD at Purdue University in Nineteenth Century British literature. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Arizona State University in English along with a secondary education certification, and his MA is in English from BYU.

Brother Hancock’s research interests include the romantics, (especially William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Joanna Baillie), the Victorian novelists (especially Charles Dickens, George Eliot, William Thackeray, and Thomas Hardy), aesthetics, gender theory, and performance theory. His dissertation title is "Shelley (En)corporated: The Romantic Sublime and Middle-Class Subjectivity in the Victorian Domestic Novel. His Article on Joanna Baillie and Percy Shelley is forthcoming in the next issue of Romanticism on the Net.

His wife Carrie and his baby daughter Maren are the two great loves of Brother Hancock’s life. He met his wife at BYU where she worked in the composition office while she was completing a degree in math education. Sister Hancock has spent the last four years working while her husband pursued his PhD. Currently she is staying home with Maren, and she looks forward to Lāʻie life. Maren's two main occupations are looking very cute and playing with her toys, both of which she does very well.

Brother Hancock was born in Pennsylvania, but only lived there until the third grade. His mother and father still live in Phoenix, Arizona, where he grew up. Besides moving for school, he also served a mission in Padova, Italy in 1990-1992.

In addition to his academic pursuits, Brother Hancock likes to sing and run 5K races.

Office: MCK 104C 

Email: hancocks@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3438 Fax: (808) 675-3662

Stephen E. Hancock 

Sherman Hsiao Ming Han
  Professor 


"I am originally from Taiwan and received my bachelor's degree from Tamkang University in 1973. I came to the United States the next year and subsequently earned my M.A. in English from Central Missouri State University, and my Ph.D. in English Literature from Brigham Young University Provo. My master'’s thesis deals with the major imagery of Dante Gabriel Rosetti’s poetry; my doctoral dissertation is entitled Roots and Buds: The Literature of the Chinese-Americans. I was twice awarded the Summer Stipend Fellowship from the National Institute of the Humanities, which allowed me to conduct post-doctoral research at both Columbia University (1981) and Stanford University (1985).

I have been a faculty member of BYU Hawaiʻi since 1980, and am currently a Professor of English and Chinese Literature. My specialties include Asian American literature, English Romanticism/Victorianism, and classical Chinese fiction. I have also been interested in the theoretical study of satire, chinese poetry in Ryukyu and the Manchu generals in the early Qing Dynasty, theories about translation, and the actual translation of poetry between English and Chinese. My papers on these subjects, written in both English and Chinese, have been published in various academic journals in Taiwan, China, and the United States. I am currently working on the history of Chinese-American writers from 1850 to the present, and on the cosmology of The Journey to the West.

I believe that all masterpieces should offer joy for general readers instead of the elite. The students in my classes are encouraged to appreciate literature from any angle they like so long as there is support within the work itself. I like my classes to be full of fresh thoughts."- Sherman Hsiao Ming Han 

Office: MCK 104F 

Email: hans@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3621 Fax: (808) 675-3662

Sherman Hsiao Ming Han

Ned B. Williams
Professor 

"I am originally from southern Idaho, but now, after twenty-five years, claim Lāʻie, Hawaiʻi as my home. I graduated with degrees from the University of Idaho, BYU, and the University at Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I have been a faculty member at BYU Hawaiʻi since 1977, except for two years as a PhD. student (Wisconsin), two years as an exchange professor (BYU), and two years on leave (Switzerland). Presently, I am serving as Chair of the Department of English.

Nineteenth and twentieth century American literature, literary theory, and creative writing are areas and disciplines of special interest to me. My papers touch upon a variety of subjects: Henry David Thoreau, Virginia Woolf, Mark Twain, John Updike, John Gardner, Roland Barthes, Hawaiian monarchy, Hawaiian history, and writing pedagogy. I have published plays, several short stories as well as a number of critical articles. My latest publications include a series of articles regarding research in the pharmaceutical industry. Previous to this, I have directed communications projects for a variety of U.S. corporations: Ford, General Motors, Exxon, Motorola, Hewlett-Packard, Chevron, and Shell, to mention a few. In short, my academic and professional interests spread over several fields of interest.

I am often inspired by the stories of our students who, despite ponderous obstacles, enter the university to seek new ideas in a friendly but alien environment. This is sometimes that lonely thinker, independent, almost invisible, who seeks for knowledge and truth with a passion, a discipline, and a restraint that lifts us who are privileged to assist in the process. I am also intrigued by students who use their university experience to learn to live lives of abundance, joy, and spirituality. I try to convince students of the wisdom of Henry David Thoreau, who once advised his readers to make sure that their footsteps were pointing in the direction of their dream" -Ned B. Williams

Office: MCK 104E 

Email: williamn@byuh.edu

   Telephone: (808) 675-3620 Fax: (808) 675-3662
Ned B. Williams

Keith S. Peterson 

Associate Professor

 

Keith S. Peterson is an Associate Professor of English. Besides general education courses in composition and literature, he also teaches Shakespeare and other courses in British Literature. Peterson completed both his undergraduate work in English literature and his Master's degree in English Literature and Rhetorical Theory at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He earned his doctorate at Texas Christian University, emphasizing Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century British literature and rhetorical and composition theory. His expertise employs textual analysis to study writing competencies and to interpret literature and its cultural influence. He has published articles in various journals, including Rhetoric Review, Teaching English in the Two-Year College, and the Virginia English Bulletin.

 Office: MCK 104B 

 Email: petersok@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3797 Fax: (808) 675-3662
Keith Peterson

Randal W. Allred
Professor 


Randal Allred was born and raised in Upland, California, about 35 miles east of Los Angeles. He is the youngest of six children of Gilbert (a teacher and later a Principal in area elementary schools) and Eunice Allred, who moved to California from their native Arizona in 1939. Of his four brothers and one sister, two are teachers and two were English majors. He married Ann Egbert in 1979, and they are the parents of four daughters (Jennie, Katherine, Bonnie, Darcie) and one son (Stephen).

His hobbies include playing the guitar, searching the scriptures, wargaming, reading, backpacking, hiking, and snorkeling. He also maintains interests in history (especially the American Civil War and the western pioneers), writing poetry, politics, Theatre, cooking, woodworking, Irish music, and Film.

He attended Chaffey College and, following an LDS mission to Ireland, transferred to BYU, where he earned a B.A. (1981) and M.A. (1983), both in English. He attended the University of North Carolina for a year, and later transferred to UCLA to resume his doctoral studies. He received his Ph.D. in English (American Literature) there in 1993, where his dissertation studied representations of the American Civil War among 19th-century writers. Prof. Allred specializes in Nineteenth Century American materials, principally in the American Renaissance, focusing on historical and contextual studies, literary transcendentalism, and Civil War writing. He also has interest in Realism and Naturalism, and has done research on De Forest, Bierce, Crane, Hawthorne, and Emerson.

He has designed and taught classes in composition, business writing, American Transcendentalism, and technology and the humanities, in addition to American literature. Publications include a handful of poems plus a recent article on Civil War battle re-enactments as a cultural text and another on Stephen Crane. He has also written a large number of articles for the Encyclopedia of War and American Popular Culture and will have several more in the forthcoming Encyclopedia of American War Literature. He has more recently published an article of Living History in the Greenwood Guide to American Popular Culture (2002). He has made numerous presentations at national conferences on issues of plagiarism and communication in the multicultural classroom, in addition to Civil War film and culture, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Stephen Crane, and John Brown. A book on Civil War fiction is in progress.

Office: MCK 103E 

Email: allredr@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3633 Fax: (808) 675-3662

Randal W. Allred

Sanoma I. Goodwill
Associate Professor 


Sanoma I. Goodwill, the oldest child of Timothy Hoyt and Doris Warren Bowers-Irons, was born in St. Johns, Arizona. Because her father was a career army officer, Sanoma, her three brothers and one sister learned to be each other’s best friends in Utah, Washington, Oklahoma, California, and Germany. She is the wife of Roger H. Goodwill, the mother of five children, and grandmother of almost 3 grandchildren. Twenty-six years after graduating from BYU Hawaiʻi, Sanoma returned to school earning a master's degree in English from Morehead State University and a PhD. in Rhetoric and Composition from University of Louisville.

In addition to teaching, Sanoma enjoys reading mystery novels, dancing, and (most of the time) writing. She began her teaching career at age 19 when she ran a pre-school in Muenchweiler, Germany. Since then she has taught English in junior high and high school, for the Army Intelligence School on Okinawa, for the American Language Academy at Idaho State University, at Morehead State University, Prestonsburg Community College, and the University of Louisville. She began teaching at BYU Hawaiʻi the Fall of 1994.

Sanoma finds great joy in teaching because the students in her classes always teach her something new about writing, about reading, and about life in general as they discuss and write about their insights into the texts of the class.

Office: MCK 104A 

Email: goodwils@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3363 Fax: (808) 675-3662

Sanoma I. Goodwill

Anna Marie Christiansen
Associate Professor


Anna Marie Christiansen received her B.A. in English from Brigham Young University Hawaiʻi (1992), her M.A. in English from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (1996), and her D.A. in English from Idaho State University (2003). In her doctoral work, she focused on mixed-race identity in African American literature and the classroom dynamics of teaching multicultural texts in a monocultural classroom. Her research interests include literature of Oceania, African-American literature, Native literatures, cultural studies and critical pedagogy. Since 1992, she has taught courses at Brigham Young University Hawaiʻi, and Idaho State University. Born in Australia and raised in the U.S. mainland, Dr. Christiansen is Maori and is affiliated with the Ngāpuhi tribe.

Office: MCK 104D 

Email: christia@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3624 Fax: (808) 675-3662

Anna Marie Christiansen

Patricia D. Patrick
Associate Professor


Patricia D. Patrick recently earned her Ph.D. in Renaissance English literature, with a minor in Renaissance studies, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is especially interested ion art history, Shakespeare, Italian literature, women's religious writing, and intercultural and interdisciplinary approaches to literature.

Office: MCK 103H

Email: ppatrick@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3603 Fax: (808) 675-3662

Patricia Patrick

Joe Plicka
Assistant Professor


Joe Plicka completed a double B.A. in English and Latin American Studies at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah (2002), where he also received a M.A. in English (2006). He earned his doctorate in English Language and Literature at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio (2011) and continued to teach literature and creative writing there for another a year as a Visiting Assistant Professor. His dissertation was a collection of short fiction (Stories for the Mongrel Heart) and an essay analyzing the inner workings of storytelling and arguing for the unique and powerful place that fictional discourse holds in any culture.

While at Ohio University, Joe also spent two years as the editor of Quarter After Eight, a national literary journal, and as an organizer of Ohio University’s long-running Spring Literary Festival. He has taught introductory literature and composition classes, beginning and advanced creative writing workshops, and courses on the form and theory of fiction. He has published short stories, poems, and is at work on a couple of novels. In his other lives, he worked as a journalist, P.E. teacher, care provider at a group home, maintenance man in the dorms at UC Davis, brick cutter, pipe painter, and paperboy.

Joe married Emily Austin in 2001. Emily also teaches in the BYU Hawaii English Department as a Special Instructor. They have two children.

Office: MCK 103G

Email: joseph.plicka@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3612 Fax: (808) 675-3662

 

Joe Plicka

Ban Phung
Associate Professor

Dr. Ban Phung is an Associate Professor at Brigham Young University-Hawaii (BYU-H).  He taught business communications in the business department for 7 years and transferred to the Department of English to develop a professional writing minor. His research focus is in professional writing, intercultural communications, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Dr. Phung earned his Ph.D. in English (emphasis in the field of contrastive rhetoric) at Arizona State University. Prior to his tenure at BYU-H, Dr. Phung taught a myriad of classes including composition, literature, linguistics, professional writing, and ESL at Mesa Community College for nine years. Born in former Saigon, Vietnam (currently Ho Chi Minh City) and coming to the United States as a child of the boat people in the 1970s, Dr. Phung draws strength from his diverse background. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his family, usually surfing, fishing, or anything involving the ocean.


Office: MCK 103B

Email:  ban.phung@byuh.edu

Telephone: (808) 675-3601